PREVALENCE OF PREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS AMONG BULGARIAN WOMEN

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.12955/pmp.v2.187

Keywords:

Premenstrual symptoms, Emotional well-being, Bulgarian women

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Premenstrual symptoms are common and can worsen women's quality of life. This study examines the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms such as weight gain; swelling of ankles, feet, and hands; frequent change of mood; fatigue; difficulty concentrating; depression; nervousness and irritability; and nausea.

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study are: (1) to reveal the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms among Bulgarian women and (2) to establish how the presence of premenstrual symptoms affects the Emotional well-being of women.

METHODS: The applied methodology includes an online-based anonymous study, which focuses on the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms among Bulgarian women and their emotional health. A characteristic of the studied contingent on age, BMI, and physical activity was made.

RESULTS:  The results of 126 women surveyed were analyzed. Of these, 96.8% have at least one premenstrual symptom. 30.2% have one or two symptoms, 43.7% have 3-4 symptoms and 23% have 5-8 symptoms. 14.8% of women with symptoms reported worsening of their symptoms because of increased stress associated with COVID-19. There is a statistically significant correlation between the number of symptoms and the emotional well-being of women.

CONCLUSION: The prevalence of premenstrual symptoms is common among the studied Bulgarian women. A greater number of symptoms has a negative effect on women's emotional well-being. We consider it appropriate to introduce the application of physiotherapeutic methods as well as alternative therapies for the treatment and prevention of premenstrual syndrome.

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Published

2021-10-24

How to Cite

Popova-Dobreva, D. . (2021). PREVALENCE OF PREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS AMONG BULGARIAN WOMEN. Proceedings of CBU in Medicine and Pharmacy, 2, 139-143. https://doi.org/10.12955/pmp.v2.187