SELF-EFFICACY AMONG STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS DURING ONLINE LEARNING SELF-EFFICACY AMONG STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS DURING ONLINE LEARNING

Authors

  • Dora Levterova-Gadjalova Plovdiv University, Educational Faculty, Education and Management of Education
  • Galin Tsokov Plovdiv University, Educational Faculty, Education and Management of Education

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.12955/pss.v2.226

Keywords:

Self-efficacy, online learning, students, HEIs

Abstract

Distance learning around the world has set new requirements for educational institutions and particularly for the students. Self-efficacy is one of the essential factors for success. Self-efficacy in an online learning environment is related to the confidence in one's ability to succeed, knowledge and ability to use the technology, and the casualness of success in the new education model, which is evolving rapidly from Education 2.0. to Education 4.0. A survey was conducted among 134 students from higher educational institutions (HEIs). The results of the study demonstrate that self-assessment,  emotional responses, motivation for academic success, and self-referential information of students in HEIs regarding the learning content are unstable.  A rise in the knowledge and usage of various electronic devices and electronic resources has been reported along with a rise in cognitive load. There is an effect of cognitive distortion on mastering the learning content and setting more challenging goals in terms of the transition from the traditional model of learning to distance learning and on their learning competencies .

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Published

2021-10-24

How to Cite

Levterova-Gadjalova, D. ., & Tsokov, G. . (2021). SELF-EFFICACY AMONG STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS DURING ONLINE LEARNING SELF-EFFICACY AMONG STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS DURING ONLINE LEARNING . Proceedings of CBU in Social Sciences, 2, 230-235. https://doi.org/10.12955/pss.v2.226
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