SOCIO-CULTURAL ADAPTATION OF CHILDREN WITH SENSORY DISABILITIES IN THE BULGARIAN SOCIO-CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT

Authors

  • Diyana Georgieva Trakia University, Bulgaria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.12955/pss.v1.50

Keywords:

socio-cultural adaptation, children with sensory impairments, integration, socio-cultural environment

Abstract

The problem of sociocultural adaptation of children with sensory disorders has a proper place in the Bulgarian sociocultural space. This article is devoted to a two-year-long study whose relevance is conditioned by the need to find ways to successfully integrate these children in a modern civilized society. The formulated aim of the study is focused on establishing the level of socio-cultural adaptation of children with impaired auditory and visual modality and the identification of factors that determine its peculiarities. 210 children with sensory impairments from early school, primary school and middle-school age were included, ditinguished into the following 4 groups: the ones with impaired hearing (n = 60), deaf children (n = 42), visually impaired children (n = 77), blind children (n = 31); 47 teachers from general and special structures, 153 parents. The methods used are: observation, surveying, interviewing, expert evaluation, analysis of normative documents and experimental materials, statistical analysis of empirical data (correlation, alternative and comparative analysis). From the summarized results, it is concluded that for children with the described model of ontogeny, socio-cultural adaptation is a concept that is represented at different levels. The clearly expressed dominants are the medium and low levels, which implies the partial or complete impossibility of fulfilling the generally accepted socio-cultural functions. In addition to the degree of sensory impairment as factors determining the characteristics of the sociocultural adaptation of children, the following factors were outlined: the professional readiness of teachers, the level of psychological and pedagogical competence of the family, and the attitudes of the society towards children with atypical development.

Author Biography

Diyana Georgieva, Trakia University, Bulgaria

Trakia University, Faculty of Education, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria

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Published

2020-11-16

How to Cite

Georgieva, D. . (2020). SOCIO-CULTURAL ADAPTATION OF CHILDREN WITH SENSORY DISABILITIES IN THE BULGARIAN SOCIO-CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT. Proceedings of CBU in Social Sciences, 1, 74-80. https://doi.org/10.12955/pss.v1.50